Alien Clock: Painting All the Things!

So rather than make individual posts for painting each of the pieces, I decided to lump everything together. The Xenomorph design has varied a lot between depictions, so really there were no specific requirements for coloring and design. I wanted something similar enough to the original designs to be recognizable, but I wasn’t that concerned about fine details.

Disclaimer: Since I don’t have an artistic bone in my body, my wife was kind enough to do most of the painting for me. She did a far better job than I ever could have and everything turned out wonderfully!

Prior to painting, I coated all the prints and the styrofoam head in liquid latex, which was an interesting experience. The bottle I purchased advertised that it was good for monster make up or making scars on faces, but it was difficult to work with to make a smooth surface. Luckily, the dried latex peeled off really easily, which was convenient in the case of mistakes but also sometimes peeled off too easily. After several tries, however, all the pieces had a nice matte finish and fleshy look to them.

Facehugger

Since Freddie the Facehugger is so large, we were a little concerned about keeping the color scheme constant if we went with the same messy approach used for Charlie. Instead, she mixed a ton of light yellowy greenish gray (again, technical terms!) as well as a darker, browner version and a deeper dark gray/brown for shadows. She coated the whole thing with the lightest shade and then contoured the edges and details with the darker colors. This approach was less detailed than mixing small amounts of each creepy bloody shade for Charlie, but it was the easiest way to keep this consistent from the tail all the way out to the arms. One extra challenge with Freddie was all the joints. We wanted to cover as much of the white PLA as possible while still allowing some flexibility. To solve this problem, we used a very watered down paint that was more translucent but soaked into the joints better and did a good job of covering all the visible white sections.

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Chestburster

For Charlie the Chestburster, she painted a base coat of yellowish peachish brown (that is the technical term for it, I believe) with some gray mixed in for texture and then added darker gray to the shadows and details to help define them. For the blood, she mixed a bright red paint with black, brown, and green to get a deeper color and painted this on thick in splotches and also watered it down to stain other areas. This was a lot of just splashing paint around and hoping for the best, but the messy look really turned out well!

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Mannequin

For the face itself, I just spray painted the styrofoam head model with two coats of “Skin colored” paint. The model had some stains and marks on it when I got it, but this really covered them up well. Plus, his face will be pretty much hidden anyway (poor guy).

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Clock Hands

The clock hands were just black and gray paint mixed together. We had to do two coats to get in all of the grooves of the uncoated PLA. The benefit of this is that it lets some of the white plastic show through and gives the “tails” a more textured look.

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Alien Clock: Making Kane’s Uniform

I decided to model the mannequin after Gilbert Kane, the first victim from the original Alien movie. In order to add some realism to the model, I decided to make his uniform from the infamous last supper scene.

He has two patches on what looks like a white shirt. The shoulder patch is the Nostromo Crew patch and the breast patch is the Weyland-Yutani logo There appears to be a pocket and some other details on the shirt, but for my purposes I’ll just use another one of my undershirts.

And luckily for me, the patches are readily available on Amazon, with the Nostromo one here and the Weyland-Yutani one here.

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Both patches were iron-on so then went on easily.

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And with that, Gilbert is ready for his last meal!

Alien Clock: Making the Mannequin

Originally I was hoping to find a full mannequin body locally to use as the “host.” Unfortunately I was unable the find anything and all of the online options seemed expensive with shipping.

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Luckily, HackPGH had some spare, foam mannequin heads lying around that they let me use for my project. Still in need of a mannequin torso, I found this Instructable which provides instructions on how to make a mannequin of your own body using duct tape casting.

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I used an undershirt as my scrap shirt and, because this project doesn’t really need an entire mannequin upper body, I stopped duct taping at my navel. I only ended up using a single roll of duct tape, but would recommend more as more layers result in the final product being stiffer.

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This is already the creepiest thing I’ve ever made, by far.

The last step for the mannequin was attaching the head to the torso. The fit was already snug so a few strips of duct tape were all that was needed to attach the head.

The wig is something I picked up from Amazon. I’m hoping to style it after Kane’s hair from the original movie.

Alien Clock: 3D printed parts are done!

I’ve finally finished the 3D printed Facehugger and Chestburster!

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The Chestburster was a simple print that used a file sourced from Thingiverse. I’m pretty happy with the way it turned out. I printed it with PLA at a 0.2mm layer height to get a good balance between speed and resolution. One issue I did notice was a striping along the Z axis. After some investigation, I attributed this to a slight bend in the Z-axis screw on my Printrbot. The striping is pretty faint, however, so I’m hoping that a layer of paint will cover it up. Additionally, there’s already a hole in the base of the Chestburster design which will make mounting it to the cuckoo mechanism trivial.

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The Facehugger was a little more difficult. I also sourced this from Thingiverse. This is an amazing piece of work by user Agisis that’s perfectly split up for 3D printing. It’s also divided into opposable pieces which will make attaching it to the victim’s face much easier.

However, because the Facehugger will be making up the clock face, I wanted to modify the body so the clock mechanism can be easily inserted. I also wanted to provide a hole in the front for the main shaft to protrude through. Unfortunately, after importing the STLs into OpenSCAD to modify, I found out the file had a bunch of errors and OpenSCAD couldn’t render it properly. After running the complex body through several STL-cleanup programs (e.g. MeshLab, Netfabb, etc.) I still couldn’t get OpenSCAD to render. About to give up and resort to drilling a hole through the completed body, I decided to read through the 150+ comments to see if someone else had encountered the same problem (Side Note: If you read through the comments, you’ll see that Agisis is one of the most helpful authors on Thingiverse. He provides a bunch of assistance to people having issues with printing, and provides a lot of advice for painting the finished product.). Lo and behold, user rodrifra had already fixed the STL files. With the repaired STL files, modifying the body was simple and all that was left was printing!

I printed one leg at a time in PLA at a 0.1mm layer height, for maximum resolution. At an hour and a half a leg, it took a while! Next was the tail, which I printed in three parts with the same settings for a total time of five hours. Last were the body files. I printed both pieces at a 0.2mm layer height to speed things along, and am happy with the results! The bottom took a total of an hour and a half to print and the top took two and a half.

Next up for these parts is gluing everything together and then painting!

Alien Clock: Description

Note: This is a mirror of my "Alien Cuckoo Clock project" submitted to the 2017 Hackaday SciFi contest. For more information, visit the project link.

The Alien Cuckoo Clock consists of several discrete pieces that will be combined to form the clock. The different pieces are:

  • Facehugger
  • Chestburster
  • Clock mechanism
  • Cuckoo mechanism
  • Mannequin
  • Electronics

Thingiverse is a great repository for premade 3D printed files and many of the designers there are far more skilled in 3D modelling than I will ever be, so I’ll be reusing open source designs from there for the Facehugger and Chestburster. I will, however, be painting them myself.

Rather than reinventing the wheel (errr… clock) I decided to buy a clock mechanism to use as the clock internals and hands. The upside of this is not having to handle clock controls or complicated gearing, but the downside is that the cuckoo mechanism will have to be synced with the clock somehow so it can be properly triggered at the top of the hour.

I’ll be designing the cuckoo mechanism myself, probably using gears or other basic components from Thingiverse. I have quite a few spare, generic, yellow motors from OpenADR, so I anticipate designing a mechanism to convert that rotary motion into the linear motion required by the Chestburster cuckoo.

The mannequin will serve as the body of the Facehugger/Chestburster victim (chestburstee?). I anticipate finding a spare full-body mannequin, if possible, and cutting off the lower portion and arms. However, if I can’t find one I can create the torso using duct tape casting and find a lifelike mannequin head on Amazon.

I’m hoping to keep the electronics for this project as simple as possible. I have plenty of Arduino’s laying around so I’ll be using one for the controller in addition to a few end-stop switches for the cuckoo mechanism and maybe a hall effect sensor to detect the top of the hour.

3D Printed Sword: Build

Printing

Material

The filament I decided to use was silver Hatchbox PLA.  After printing the coloring of the plastic turned out more of a shiny gray than a silver.  While I knew I was going to paint the sword anyway, I wanted a grayish base color so that the color of the filament wouldn’t show through.  Plus, if the sword ever gets scratched, the dull gray scratch color will look more realistic.

Settings

My biggest concern for the printed parts used for the sword was the strength, specifically the strength between print layers.  This was most critical on the blade of the sword, due to its length and weight providing a lever arm that could cause the prints to snap.  Additionally, due to the way I decided to print out the blade, speed became an issue.  I oriented the sword segments so that the blade was divided along the X-Y plane.  This meant that the longest axis was in the Z direction.  The Z-axis is also commonly the slowest on a 3D printer, mainly because a leadscrew is usually used.  To compensate for all of these design concerns, I tried to find an optimal balance between weight, strength (particularly layer adhesion), and print time.

After reading numerous studies and suggestions, I decided on a layer height of 0.3mm and width of 0.4mm.  I also ran the hotend a little on  the hotter side at 210C.  Because I planned on sanding and finishing, allowing for a little stringing (a common result of too-high hotend temperature) was well worth the added strength and layer adhesion it provided.  I also kept the infill a little low at 10% so the blade wouldn’t be too heavy.

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The 18 50mm segments of the blade are shown above.  They turned out pretty good with minimal stringing.  One noticeable feature on the outside of the blade segments are the vertical lines.  These are caused by interaction between the internal hole perimeters and outside perimeters.  There’s isn’t enough space for both sets of perimeters and so some external artifacts are present on the outside.  Luckily these can be easily hidden by the finishing process.

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The two halves of the pommel didn’t turn out as well as I’d hoped.  Because I printed with the center of the pommel on the bed, there wasn’t enough support for the circular arch that would hold the grip.  This can hopefully be fixed with some sanding and finishing.  Also shown above is the hole that the blade will be glued into.

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Lastly are the grip and pommel.  The grip was printed in two halves and held together by a metal spine.  Three 2mm holes were extended through the length of the grip so the pommel and blade could both be securely attached.

Assembly

The majority of the build time was spent assembling the blade, because it’s the most complex part.  I used cyanoacrylate glue (super glue) due to it’s good adhesion to PLA.  The brand I used was also labeled as “gap filling.”  I figured this would be useful if the tops and bottoms of the blade segments were slightly warped or didn’t match up properly.

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I also used a metal spine to prevent stress on the glue joints and provide additional strength to the blade.  Due to the metal pieces only being 300mm long, I trimmed the rods so that, when transitioning from one rod to another, the joint is in the center of a blade segment.

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I was able to fit three metal spines at the wider base of the blade.

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I cut the metal rods so that a decent portion would protrude from the bottom.  These extra length could then be used to mount the blade to the grip.

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With the pieces all glued together, the next step was coating it!

Finishing

The process of finishing the blade was divided into three main parts, coating, sanding, and painting, with an additional step of leather wrapping the grip.  These steps weren’t terribly difficult, but nevertheless the finishing took a long time, with each step requiring patience.

Epoxy Coating

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The first step in finishing the sword involved coating the plastic in epoxy.  The brand I used was XTC-3D.  It works like most epoxy, involving mixing the two parts together to get a rapidly curing mixture.  I then had about five minutes before the epoxy hardened to brush it on to the plastic.  After this was a four hour wait for the epoxy to finish curing.  Once completely hardened, the epoxy left a hard, clear coat over the plastic.  This had the added benefit of adding more strength to the plastic by holding together the print layers and separate parts.  Because I planned on sanding the pieces anyway, I used an excessive amount of epoxy when coating, as is evident by the visible epoxy drips.

Because I had to apply the coating two each side of the blade separately, I had to wait four hours between each half.  I also wanted to apply three coats to the blade.  What resulted from this was the week long process of coating the blade because I only effectively had time for one half of a coat once I had gotten home from work.

Sanding

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The next step was sanding down the epoxy coating to a smooth, metal-like surface.  This was by far the most tedious process.  I initially bought plain sandpaper and started the process of sanding everything down by hand.  As I soon realized, this was a profoundly terrible idea and would have taken forever.  I shortly gave up and bought a random orbit sander.  The benefit of the “random orbit” was that no directional sanding lines would show up on the finished piece, and so the sword would look uniformly smooth, just like actual steel.

New toy in tow, I forged (pun intended) on with the process of smoothing out the pieces of the sword.  I started out by using 80 grit sandpaper to sand the flat surfaces of the blade entirely flat, and then slowly worked my way through 150, 220, 320, 400, and 600 grit sandpapers.  These left me with an incredibly smooth surface that was ready for painting.

One downside of the sanding that I noticed was that the vibrations caused some of the superglued joints to come undone.  Both the pommel and a piece of the blade had to be reglued.  The blade one actually happened after painting and was difficult to repair.

Painting

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The last step was painting everything.  This was the simplest step, but was still time consuming due to having to wait for each coat to dry before flipping over the sword to paint the other side.  I spray painted each of the pieces separately with silver spray paint, with several coats for each piece.

Leather Wrapping

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As a bonus step, I decided to wrap the hilt in leather to add a nice touch to the finished product.  I cut the leather roughly to size stretched it out a bit, then superglued one edge to the grip.  I specifically left the grip unpainted so that the glue would have a stronger hold on the plastic part.  I then tightly wrapped the leather around the octagonal grip, applying glue on each face.

Failings

While I’m fairly happy with how the finished product turned out, there are two things that didn’t turn out as I’d hoped.  Mainly the stiffness of the blade was lacking and joints between blade segments couldn’t handle the stress of the finishing process.

Stiffness

While the PLA is stiff enough to prevent significant bending, the metal rods have a certain flexibility that allow some give at the inter-blade joints.  As a result, the blade is more flexible than I’d like.  I had to handle the sword very carefully for fear of the joint bending causing the blade to crack or break.  If I attempt a repeat of this project, or something like it, I’ll have to consider a fix for this.

One option would be to use a different type of joint.  The current, flat joint that I’m using allows for some space between the segments where the metal rods can bend.  If I had used some type of overlapping joint it’s possible that the flexibility would have been reduced.

Another alternative would be to use a stiffer material for the blade spine.  Something like carbon fiber rods would be much hopefully be much stiffer.  The only concern with this would be the lack of flexibility putting more strain on the glue joints between segments.

Cracking

The biggest issue I had was with the blade segment joints not being strong enough to withstand the finishing process.  Specifically the vibrations from the sander caused the joint adhesion to fail in one particular spot.

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Near the top of the blade, where the cross section of the blade was small and only one spine held the segments together, the glue joint repeatedly failed.

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At first I reapplied both the glue and the epoxy coating and sanded it down again.  However this caused a second failure, at which point I gave up and just used a lot of super glue and some light sanding.  Fortunately the poor finish isn’t too noticeable at a distance.

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Another part of the blade partially cracked towards the bottom.  Some of the epoxy came out between the blade segments leaving a slight crack.  Because spray paint is so thin, it was unable to hide this defect.

I think the only solution to the strength problem would be to  change the way I’m joining the segments since the superglue doesn’t seem to be strong enough.  Two different methods I could use would be heat or friction welding when using PLA, or solvent welding when using ABS.  These methods would hopefully make the whole blade into one cohesive unit.

Another possible option would be to use a different kind of paint.  I used spray paint which is thin by necessity and has trouble hiding defects.  Using a thicker, brush-on paint would have done a better job hiding the cracks that popped up.

Finished Product

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Despite the issues I had I’m mostly happy with the finished product.  Unfortunately not all projects can be resounding successes, but I learned some new techniques and have a nice decoration for my office now!

HAL 9000: Wiring

BOM

Wiring

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With the Raspberry Pi as the centerpiece, I went about connecting everything together.  The first step was wiring up the sound.  I took a stereo audio cable plugged into the Raspberry Pi’s audio port and wired each of the left and right channels into its own amplifier.  The power and ground of both amplifiers was sourced from the Raspberry Pi’s 5V and GND pins on the GPIO header.  I then wired the outputs of one of the amplifiers to the speaker.  The outputs of the other amplifier were wired to the LED in the button.  By doing this, the light inside of HAL’s eye would flash in sync with the audio being played.  Aside from that, all that was left to do was plug in the USB microphone and I was done.  One optional addition I might make in the future is wiring up the inputs of the button.  This would provide the possibility to activate Alexa via means other than the wake word.