Alien Clock: Description

Note: This is a mirror of my "Alien Cuckoo Clock project" submitted to the 2017 Hackaday SciFi contest. For more information, visit the project link.

The Alien Cuckoo Clock consists of several discrete pieces that will be combined to form the clock. The different pieces are:

  • Facehugger
  • Chestburster
  • Clock mechanism
  • Cuckoo mechanism
  • Mannequin
  • Electronics

Thingiverse is a great repository for premade 3D printed files and many of the designers there are far more skilled in 3D modelling than I will ever be, so I’ll be reusing open source designs from there for the Facehugger and Chestburster. I will, however, be painting them myself.

Rather than reinventing the wheel (errr… clock) I decided to buy a clock mechanism to use as the clock internals and hands. The upside of this is not having to handle clock controls or complicated gearing, but the downside is that the cuckoo mechanism will have to be synced with the clock somehow so it can be properly triggered at the top of the hour.

I’ll be designing the cuckoo mechanism myself, probably using gears or other basic components from Thingiverse. I have quite a few spare, generic, yellow motors from OpenADR, so I anticipate designing a mechanism to convert that rotary motion into the linear motion required by the Chestburster cuckoo.

The mannequin will serve as the body of the Facehugger/Chestburster victim (chestburstee?). I anticipate finding a spare full-body mannequin, if possible, and cutting off the lower portion and arms. However, if I can’t find one I can create the torso using duct tape casting and find a lifelike mannequin head on Amazon.

I’m hoping to keep the electronics for this project as simple as possible. I have plenty of Arduino’s laying around so I’ll be using one for the controller in addition to a few end-stop switches for the cuckoo mechanism and maybe a hall effect sensor to detect the top of the hour.

HAL 9000: Replica Design

For my design of the HAL 9000 enclosure, I mainly used Adafruit’s HAL 9000 replica guide as a baseline.  However, I decided to 3D print most of the pieces since I don’t have access to a laser cutter or any power tools.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The only piece that I ended up buying was the button, so I followed that section of the tutorial closely, but mainly used the linked references for the design of the case.

img_0770

Because of the 250x150mm limitation of the print bed, I broke up the case into parts.  The two outside sets of pieces are the vertical walls of HAL, the two pieces with center holes are horizontal walls that will have wiring run through them.  The top piece on the center-left side is the top of HAL.  The piece with a grid of holes is the speaker grill.  Lastly are the two black pieces, which form the main plate with a hole for the red “eye.”  Also notice the black rectangle at the top; this will be the space to put the HAL 9000 label.  I left this to save myself time measuring when applying the label.

img_0779

The next step was gluing all of the pieces together, and HAL starts to take shape!

img_0784

Because the plate is black, even if I don’t cut the label to the exact size, it won’t be noticeable.

img_0788

The last step is popping in the painted button, and HAL 9000 is complete!

One additional step I’d like to use in the future is applying the same coating, sanding, and painting steps I used for the sword on HAL, to make the replica look more metallic and accurate.  This would not only help cover up the seams between parts but would also help me replicate the brushed aluminum look on the original HAL’s black face plate.